Editorial: Beason goes to D.C. (maybe) — Alabamians know what they’d get if state senator is elected to Congress
by The Anniston Star Editorial Board
Feb 11, 2014 | 2107 views |  0 comments | 21 21 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Sen. Scott Beason, R-Gardendale, talks with reporters during a public hearing over potential changes to a strict immigration law at the Alabama Statehouse in Montgomery, Ala., Wednesday, April 11, 2012. Beason said he will oppose any major changes in the law which many consider to be the harshest in the nation. Photo: Dave Martin/The Associated Press
Sen. Scott Beason, R-Gardendale, talks with reporters during a public hearing over potential changes to a strict immigration law at the Alabama Statehouse in Montgomery, Ala., Wednesday, April 11, 2012. Beason said he will oppose any major changes in the law which many consider to be the harshest in the nation. Photo: Dave Martin/The Associated Press
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State Sen. Scott Beason is running for Congress, not that anyone should be surprised. He’s done it before.

It is his familiar refrain. When he announced last month that he would not run for re-election to the Alabama Senate, Beason speculation took on new life. Now he has announced his candidacy and is the last of seven candidates who will try to fill the spot left by vacating U.S. Rep. Spencer Bachus.

If nothing else, voters in Alabama’s 6th congressional district should know what they would get if this Gardendale Republican represents them in Washington.

Beason was one of the leading legislators who pushed through Alabama’s sweeping immigration bill — some would anti-immigrant bill — that the courts have gutted. We assume from this lesson in constitutional law that if Beason got to Congress he would know what the courts would accept and govern himself accordingly.

Yet, given his record, ill-conceived remarks and racially insensitive statements – telling lawmakers they need to “empty the clip” when combating illegal immigration, or his reference to black voters as “aborigines” – there is little reason to believe that the 6th district would have a reasonable, level-headed, representative who has learned from his experiences should Beason prevail.

Beason’s record suggests a legislator who will exploit a hot issue without considering the consequences, as he did when he sponsored gun legislation that ended up dividing two of the GOP’s most loyal constituencies, the National Rifle Association and the Business Council of Alabama, over the issue of guns in the workplace.

This is what the 6th congressional district will get if Scott Beason is elected to Congress. And though the rest of Alabama wouldn’t be up there voting with him, it would hurt the entire state, nonetheless.
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