Lost Things
by JanCase
 The Church Lady
Mar 17, 2014 | 2778 views |  0 comments | 178 178 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
Lost
Lost
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Found
Found
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Why does finding something that was lost feel so much better than not losing it?

Everyone knows the instant blast of happiness when lost keys show up. My sister in law sent a massive group text with a photo of her lost eyeglasses that she found in her dishwasher. She proclaimed them not just found, but clean! Luke’s gospel devotes chapter 15 to the joy of finding lost things. If there are any universal human traits, this might be one of them.

My most recent lost thing was a snap-on accessory for my shoes. I looked down and saw that one foot looked pretty snazzy, while the other had a sad empty snap where a rosette should have been. It was the end of a day in which I had walked all over my three story building at work. I was retracing my steps sure that any other finder of my shoe-completing treasure would toss it in the trash as an unidentifiable bauble. I had no luck, but I did explain the situation to a member of our housekeeping staff who noticed my search and rescue behavior and asked if she could be of help. A couple of weeks later, I received a call that someone had left something for me in the office. See the photos and imagine my delight.

If my lost accessory is a present day comparison to Luke’s lost coin, then his lost sheep would be the modern lost pet. Anyone who has ever had a dog or cat go AWOL knows the meaning of anguish. This feeling is so prevalent in our culture that AT&T used it in a 30 second commercial for its network. It’s a shameless marketing play on emotion, but it chokes me up every time. You can watch it at the link below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x73qF3AvLT8



Now, wouldn’t it have been better if Sarah hadn’t gotten lost in the first place? Of course it would, but even the joy of having a sweet dog at home is dwarfed by the joy of finding that sweet dog when she is lost.

Luke completes the trilogy that begins with lost things and lost animals with Jesus’ parable of the lost son known by everyone as the prodigal. I love sassy shoes and sweet dogs, but the love-o-meter jumps several orders of magnitude when my children are added to the mix.  If there is one story that summarizes the entire Bible, it is this story of the joy of redemption when a precious lost son is found. It’s almost like we’re born knowing this truth. Among the first games children enjoy are peek-a-boo and hide and seek.  The fun of Easter egg hunts and scavenger hunts is what makes us vulnerable for snipe hunts during those awkward adolescent years. People love to find lost things. It may be a coincidence, or it may be God’s message that there is always grace to be found.

 

Forecasting What Will Happen & Explaining Why It Didn’t (And Vice Versa)
by JanCase
 The Church Lady
Feb 13, 2014 | 4420 views |  0 comments | 389 389 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

My responsible, obedient, first-born, Baptist outer shell has turned out to be a thin cover for a complete sloth. I plan my classes to the minute for the entire semester and have everything printed out in compelling chart form weeks before the first day of class. I assess my students (both formatively and summatively, thank you) for every learning objective. So, when the forecasts of snow and ice descended upon the sunny south, I was amazed at how quickly my best laid plans were tossed aside in favor of the no school happy dance. There was the most fleeting how-will-I-ever-catch-up thought quickly followed by the joy of nothing-I-can-do. I had a twinge of guilt over the televised stranded motorist phenomena, so I sat a little closer to the fire and got out some more snacks until the feeling passed.

It’s amazing how permanent life seems yet how unpredictable and ephemeral it actually is. We see disaster where it isn’t and then get completely blindsided by massive events. Remember Y2K? Neither do my students. Not because nothing happened but because they were only 5 years old at the time, as they gently reminded me. At the other end, how did no one see 9-11 or the financial meltdown coming? We’ve all raided the grocery store in preparation for snow and ice that never materialized, but there are local teachers who I am certain will never forget the bliss of spending the night at school courtesy of unpredicted ice.

Back in my church youth group days, a popular novel by Hal Lindsey called The Late Great Planet Earth scared the dickens out of an entire generation with its forecasts of doom and terror during the Earth’s last days. We lit candles and sang “I Wish We’d All Been Ready.” No wonder we morphed into the 80s Me Generation – if that prediction had any merit, we’d better get on with our big hair, big cars and big houses before Tribulation came down on our heads. It was the lifestyle equivalent of raiding the grocery store.

Wisdom might not come with age, but at least there is an appreciation of the mystery that surrounds us from eternity right down to tomorrow’s weather. Beyond a sense of nothing-I-can-do there is a freedom that comes from humbly recognizing that our place in time is fleeting, yet valuable. And that somehow I can whip that syllabus back into shape.

Peacock Theology
by JanCase
 The Church Lady
Oct 19, 2013 | 8211 views |  0 comments | 374 374 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
vanity wide angle
vanity wide angle
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vanity close up
vanity close up
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It seems that Pope Francis’ question, “Who am I to judge?” has attracted answers from everyone with access to the internet. Now, I’m as smitten with this humble pontiff as a Southern Baptist girl can be, and I could not be more charmed with the world’s response to his embodiment of Christianity. I’m pretty sure he was responding to a specific question about gay priests, but somehow the idea has taken hold that maybe being judgmental isn’t a hallmark of the followers of Jesus after all. Glory, halleluiah!

The Hebrew Bible tells us that God’s people were originally ruled by judges, but being envious of the nations with kings, they wanted one of their own. The prophets tried to tell them that this was not a good idea, but if we learn anything from the Bible it’s that people never listen to the prophets. If you think they were foolish to envy being under the thumb of a monarch, then you must be one of the 11 people in the United States who did not get up in the pre-dawn hours to watch Will & Kate’s vows --- a phenomenon made even more amusing by the fact that the USA exists because people were sick of their king. Reading I & II Kings reveals some Israelites who got really fed up with theirs too.

Judging others is not necessarily a bad thing. I remember an adult Sunday School class where the “Who am I to judge?” topic came up. Considering that one member of the class was a federal judge, it was obvious that some people are qualified and even required to judge others. Sometimes we appreciate this, and sometimes it knocks the luster off our affection. I was a fan of both Steven Tyler and Martha Stewart until they entered the reality show realm-- he as a judge and she as a subject to a ridiculous judge with a hideous comb over.  It just hasn’t been the same with us since.

I’m a study in dissonance when it comes to judging and being judged.  No skill is more easily mastered than the ability to judge the flaws of others. Not only is this skill a delight to practice, it has the added bonus of confirming my own vanity. But I seldom welcome criticism directed at me, not even the constructive kind ---especially not the constructive kind. It’s a tricky subject to address because warning people about being judgmental can come off sounding very judgmental. Take it from the Pope, “The reality of vanity is this: Look at the peacock; it’s beautiful if you look at it from the front, but if you look at it from behind you discover the truth. Whoever gives in to such self-absorbed vanity has huge misery hiding inside them.” 

Kids These Days
by JanCase
 The Church Lady
Oct 06, 2013 | 2276 views |  0 comments | 105 105 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

My husband has been fortunate to have a car donated for his use during much of his coaching career. The latest is a snazzy candy apple red BMW with enough blue tooth capability to handle basically everything in our middle aged lives. (And yes, I realize that label implies an assumption that both of us will live past the century mark.) During a recent ride we had a question about the music features. I immediately looked in the glove compartment but the car, like my iPad, understands that actual printed owner’s manuals are so 20th century. Our next bright idea was that it was probably stored somewhere in the car’s computer and when we managed to call it up it gave us a polite message that we shouldn’t be reading instructions unless the car was in park. I’m sure the view from the front of the car would show it indulgently rolling its headlights at our efforts. Finally my husband solved the problem by saying, “I’ll just ask Tyler.” As if this needs explaining,Tyler is a 20something co-worker who has never been in the car, but will know the answer immediately. It reminded me of a lady who once stopped my daughter on the street with the question, “You look young. Could you fix my iPod?” My daughter saw that the woman had accidentally set the device to play the same song over and over again. She reset it and the woman thanked her and left happy.

Recently a Los Angeles school district launched a $1 billion project to provide each of its students with an iPad fitted with security settings by school administrators.  It took the first students who received the devices a week to alter the settings, get on social media, and teach all the other students how to enable the capabilities that the adults had protected them from. The project was immediately halted, because what should be done when innovative educators are out-innovated by the students? Not only that, but any teacher who could teach a skill at near mastery level to one of the largest school systems in the country in a week’s time would undoubtedly be hailed as teacher of the century. It was like the ending of every Scooby Doo cartoon when the adult lamented that his plans were perfect if it hadn’t been for those pesky kids! Then, the adult often pulled a mask off his face, which confused me as a child because I had never seen this happen in real life, but it seemed like a great idea to the cartoon perpetrator almost weekly.

Every generation thinks that the previous one is out of touch and the following one is out of control. If anything is different now, it’s that the latest generation has the best toys of all time. As an educator, it feels like uncharted territory. As a parent, it’s a relief that I can ask my kids for help. As a church goer, it’s obvious that we can’t just project PowerPoint slides in the sanctuary and call ourselves cutting edge. Influencing the next generation may involve a little more humility than we can comfortably muster. I guess I'd better get used to house bands instead of choirs and preachers in skinny jeans and fashionably wrinkled shirts. Insert an audible sigh here. On the bright side, the young church attendees seem to consider faith without works to be dead and to value people over social norms --- sounds awfully Biblical to me. 

Hit It or Swerve?
by JanCase
 The Church Lady
Sep 29, 2013 | 2381 views |  0 comments | 141 141 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
These guys have great reflexes.
These guys have great reflexes.
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He was helping her out of the ditch when I slowed my bike to a stop on the Ladiga Trail. She righted her bicycle, brushed herself off and explained with one word, “squirrel.” I nodded my understanding. My friend Rene once spent some time on crutches with a cast on her ankle for the same reason. When those bushy tailed rodents stop in the middle of the lane and do their little shimmy dance, why do we swerve? People can not out-reflex squirrels.

 My father taught high school driver education in addition to many other hats he wore during 30 years with the Birmingham City Schools, and he used to quiz me about driving situations. The one I always got right was probably the most useful too. Question: “What if something is in your lane and you don’t have time to stop?” Answer:  “Hit it.”  Dad was convinced that swerving while driving a car could make any accident more serious and he wanted to train my first thought to be “Hit it.” The rule came in handy when a ladder fell off the truck in front of me while driving on I-20 in heavy traffic, and also when assorted wildlife darted in front of my vehicle over the years. Swerving can cause a lot of trouble, and frankly, it almost never saves the deer either.

 We can’t always weigh every option when faced with a quick decision regarding an obstacle in our path. But what about the things in life that are more important than bicycles, ankles, cars or deer? How do we know when to take a stand and when to keep the peace?  I’ve always been a big fan of Dietrich Bonhoeffer who was one of the first Christians to stand up to Adolf Hitler. Bonhoeffer became so frustrated by the lack of action among his fellow clergy that he became involved in a plot to assassinate Hitler. As it turns out, good Christians do not always make good assassins and evil dictators have a much higher success rate when it comes to killing off their opponents. I’m not an advocate of assassination in general, but you have to admit Bonhoeffer decided not to swerve.

 WWJD? Jesus seemed to have an inordinate amount of patience with some people and a very short fuse with others. He compared respected teachers to whitewashed tombs --- pristine outside but dead inside. He invited outcasts to eat and chat. He was no stranger to verbal barbs nor to words of compassion that surpassed anything the world had ever seen. And of course there was that incident in the temple with the overturned tables.

 So how to know? Maybe when I feel like telling someone off I should show love, and when I feel like melting into the woodwork I should speak out. Courage is an interesting virtue… one you may not know you have (or don’t have) until faced with a dictator or a table that needs to be overturned.

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