HOT BLAST: Oh, yeah, North Korea
Apr 24, 2013 | 2310 views |  0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
North Korean Army Col. Kim Chang Jun, stands behind field binoculars on a hilltop overlooking the demilitarized zone which separates the two Koreas on Wednesday. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
North Korean Army Col. Kim Chang Jun, stands behind field binoculars on a hilltop overlooking the demilitarized zone which separates the two Koreas on Wednesday. (AP Photo/David Guttenfelder)
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Lost in last week's tragedies in Boston and West, Texas, was North Korea, which has been engaged in saber-rattling this month.

Here's a quick update:

THE GUARDIAN: "Hopes of a diplomatic breakthrough on the Korean peninsula have dimmed after North Korea dismissed US conditions for talks as "totally unacceptable" and demanded to be recognised as a nuclear state. After weeks of tension in the region, including North Korean threats of nuclear war, Pyongyang had appeared willing to consider negotiations. But on Tuesday, the state-controlled Rodong Sinmun newspaper rejected the condition that the North must first begin to demonstrate a willingness to dismantle its nuclear weapons programme and suspend missile launches."

REUTERS: "The top U.S. military officer said on Wednesday Chinese leaders had assured him that they were working on persuading North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons program."

CBS NEWS: "A U.N. agency tasked with looking for signs of nuclear explosions says its monitoring stations have detected radioactive gases that could be linked to North Korea's Feb. 12 test."

FOREIGN POLICY: 
Do we really want the North Koreans to prove they can launch a nuke with a missile?

 

JAMES SCHOFF, senior associate on the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Asia Program: "The challenge for Washington is that it has competing goals. It wants to send a strong deterrence message to North Korea to prevent miscalculation, as well as reassure allies like South Korea and Japan that it won't forget about their interests or get soft on North Korea. At the same time, however, it wants to avoid escalating tensions while containing or freezing the North’s nuclear programs, if it can’t eliminate them altogether."

-- Bob Davis

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