A strong financial education makes good 'cents'
by Brandpoint (ARA) Sponsored Content
Mar 21, 2013 | 19402 views | 0 0 comments | 219 219 recommendations | email to a friend | print
(BPT) - Millennials, also known as Generation Y or those born between 1978 and 1994, are money movers. They’re wielding more purchasing power, spending $200 billion annually, and are expected to outspend the baby boomer generation by 2017, according to Kelton Research. At the same time, they face an increasingly complex global economy that puts heavy responsibility on individuals to plan for and manage their own finances from pre-college years through retirement.

This overwhelming reality presents both an opportunity and an obligation to enhance the financial literacy of young people so they’re better prepared for the world they will encounter upon graduation. However, Millennials aren’t the only demographic that would benefit from more resources to improve financial knowledge. No matter your age or income, having financial literacy will always be essential to making smart money decisions. One family-friendly resource available is TheMint.org – a website that provides educational tools and resources about budgeting, saving, tracking and investing money. 

Financial literacy by the numbers

Young Americans are in a tough spot, financially. Today’s 20-somethings hold an average individual debt of about $45,000 between student loans, credit cards, car payments, mortgages and other sources, according to PNC Bank, a staggering burden for an unprepared young person to carry, exacerbated by an elevated unemployment level among this group. 

Consequently, this group is significantly more likely to feel that financial planning is complicated and overwhelming, according to a recent study by Northwestern Mutual. The study found that young people rank “not falling below your current standard of living” as an important financial goal, but only 54 percent believe that they are on track to achieve this goal.

And it’s not just young people who feel they could be more financially prepared. The majority of Americans feel their financial planning needs improvement. In fact, Americans rated “improving personal finances” as their second highest annual priority, according to Northwestern Mutual’s study. They are also worried they’re unprepared to financially support themselves into their 70s, 80s and 90s.

Education is empowering

This month, get thinking about how you can improve your financial literacy and become better prepared for your future. You can use resources such as TheMint.org to re-teach yourself and your children how to manage money wisely. Understanding the fundamentals of personal finance is the first step to planning for the rest of your financial future. So why not learn more? It just makes “cents.”

For more information, and a variety of educational resources and interactive tools, visit themint.org.
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A strong financial education makes good 'cents' by Brandpoint (ARA) Sponsored Content

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