HOT BLAST: What's so special about cinema?
Aug 23, 2013 | 1861 views |  0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this publicity photo, Jodie Foster portrays a 12-year-old prostitute in the 1976 movie "Taxi Driver," which was directed by Martin Scorsese. (AP Photo/Columbia Pictures, File)
In this publicity photo, Jodie Foster portrays a 12-year-old prostitute in the 1976 movie "Taxi Driver," which was directed by Martin Scorsese. (AP Photo/Columbia Pictures, File)
slideshow

In a New York Review of Books essay, acclaimed filmmaker Martin Scorsese writes:

Frank Capra said, “Film is a disease.” I caught the disease early on. I felt it whenever I walked up to the ticket booth with my mother or my father or my brother. You’d go through the doors, up the thick carpet, past the popcorn stand that had that wonderful smell—then to the ticket taker, and then in some of the old theaters there would be another set of doors with little windows and you’d get a glimpse of something magical happening up there on the screen, something special. And as we entered, for me it was like entering a sacred space, a kind of sanctuary where the living world around me seemed to be recreated and played out.

What was it about cinema? What was so special about it? I think I’ve discovered some of my own answers to that question a little bit at a time over the years.

Movie fans will be fascinated by his answers

Comments must be made through Facebook
No personal attacks
No name-calling
No offensive language
Comments must stay on topic
No infringement of copyrighted material


Friends to Follow



Today's Events

event calendar

post a new event

Thursday, April 17, 2014

Marketplace