HOT BLAST: Detailing the rise and influence of the NRA
Dec 19, 2013 | 1244 views |  0 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print
NRA Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer Wayne LaPierre speaks during the leadership forum at the National Rifle Association's annual meeting May 3 in Houston. (AP)
NRA Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer Wayne LaPierre speaks during the leadership forum at the National Rifle Association's annual meeting May 3 in Houston. (AP)
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Statistics tell us that if you live in the South, there's a good chance you support gun rights and you likely own at least one gun -- legally, that is.

If that's the case, you're likely to find this story about the National Rifle Association in The New York Times magazine interesting. It pulls no punches -- the NRA and its executives hardly come across as rational sorts -- but it nonetheless details the growth of the organization and its political influence in Washington.

The magazine wrote, "Following the Columbine shootings in 1999, in which some of the weapons used were bought at gun shows, President Clinton pushed for universal background checks. Initially, the N.R.A. went on record supporting an amendment that watered down a bill extending background checks to gun shows. But ultimately the scandal-ridden and lame-duck president was no match for the N.R.A., whose congressional allies killed the bill entirely. By the time the Virginia Tech murders occurred in 2007, it was a fact of life in Washington: Any major legislation that the N.R.A. opposed stood little to no chance of passage."

-- Phillip Tutor
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